Monday, April 1, 2013

Addressing Inequalities and Fostering Inclusive Growth Monday, April 8, 2013



You are cordially invited to attend

The
You are cordially invited to attend

The Post-2015 Global Development Agenda:
Addressing Inequalities and Fostering Inclusive Growth

Monday, April 8, 2013 • Noon-1:30 p.m. ET

To attend in person in Washington, D.C., register at:
http://www.eventbrite.com/event/5853304391#. (Registration is required.)

To watch the video webcast or a recording, go to
http://www.ustream.tv/channel/urban-institute-events. (No registration is necessary.)
What will replace the Millennium Development Goals after their 2015 deadline? Growing global inequality has been highlighted as a key policy challenge, but there are both practical and political obstacles to targeting inequality with an actionable agenda. Please join the Urban Institute for a presentation and discussion on the current state of the post-2015 global development agenda, and the importance of equity and inclusiveness in the formulation of new development targets.
Discussion will be led by
Mr. Nicola Crosta,
Head of Knowledge, Policy and Advocacy
United Nations Capital Development Fund 
Nicola Crosta joined the United Nations Capital Development Fund (UNCDF) in 2008 as representative and chief technical advisor in Cambodia. Prior to working with UNCDF, Crosta spent over a decade working on development policy issues at the Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) in Paris.
Mr. Crosta will be joined in discussion by
  • Steven Feldstein, director of the Office of Policy in the Bureau for Policy, Planning and Learning at the United States Agency for International Development
  • Michael Klosson, vice president for policy and humanitarian response for Save the Children
  • Charles Cadwell, director, Urban Institute Center on International Development and Governance, (moderator)
At the Urban Institute2100 M Street N.W., 5th Floor, Washington, D.C.
Please bring your lunch; light refreshments will be provided. The forum begins promptly at noon.



:
Addressing Inequalities and Fostering Inclusive Growth

Monday, April 8, 2013 • Noon-1:30 p.m. ET

To attend in person in Washington, D.C., register at:
http://www.eventbrite.com/event/5853304391#. (Registration is required.)

To watch the video webcast or a recording, go to
http://www.ustream.tv/channel/urban-institute-events. (No registration is necessary.)
What will replace the Millennium Development Goals after their 2015 deadline? Growing global inequality has been highlighted as a key policy challenge, but there are both practical and political obstacles to targeting inequality with an actionable agenda. Please join the Urban Institute for a presentation and discussion on the current state of the post-2015 global development agenda, and the importance of equity and inclusiveness in the formulation of new development targets.
Discussion will be led by
Mr. Nicola Crosta,
Head of Knowledge, Policy and Advocacy
United Nations Capital Development Fund 
Nicola Crosta joined the United Nations Capital Development Fund (UNCDF) in 2008 as representative and chief technical advisor in Cambodia. Prior to working with UNCDF, Crosta spent over a decade working on development policy issues at the Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) in Paris.
Mr. Crosta will be joined in discussion by
  • Steven Feldstein, director of the Office of Policy in the Bureau for Policy, Planning and Learning at the United States Agency for International Development
  • Michael Klosson, vice president for policy and humanitarian response for Save the Children
  • Charles Cadwell, director, Urban Institute Center on International Development and Governance, (moderator)
At the Urban Institute2100 M Street N.W., 5th Floor, Washington, D.C.
Please bring your lunch; light refreshments will be provided. The forum begins promptly at noon.



Water Wars: Peru’s engineers ‘make’ their own drinkable water in response to shortages outside of Lima


By Agence France-Presse

Wednesday, March 27, 2013 5:46 EDT
The message emblazoned on a billboard outside the Peruvian capital sounds almost too good to be true: drinkable water for anyone who wants some in this arid village.
Even more intriguingly, the fresh, pure water on offer along a busy road in this dusty town some 90 kilometers (55 miles) south of Lima, has been extracted, as if by magic, from the humid air.
Within the enormous, raised, double-paneled billboard inviting all takers is concealed a tube, wires and mechanical equipment that draws the water from the air and purifies it.

Inhabitants from far and wide who flock here toting liter bottles and buckets say this purified water is a wonderful alternative to the stagnant well water that used to be the only water source for many in this town.
“The water that we get in our houses very often is dirty. By contrast, here we have good water that we can use and drink without having to worry,” Francisco Quilca, 52 told AFP.
His wife Wilma Flores says that it gives her peace of mind, “knowing that the water is disinfected. We can drink it and we can use it to wash our vegetables in,” she said.
The United Nations on Friday marked its World Water Day initiative which aims to cut water-borne diseases like cholera, dysentery and diarrhea around the world.
It is a perennial problem in Lima and the surrounding area, where about one million of the more than eight million people lack reliably clean water.
Faced with the ongoing water shortage, some innovators at Peru’s University for Engineering and Technology hit upon the novel idea.

“If the problem is water, we’ll make some,” said Alejandro Aponte, one of the people who worked on the project, which was both an engineering feat and a marketing challenge.
Enough water is sucked from the air by this huge contraption located on the edge of a busy highway in Peru to fill a 100-liter tank each day.
The system required a location where the humidity was at least 30 percent — not a problem in Lima, where the dewpoint sometimes hits an unbearably sticky 98 percent, despite the barren landscape where there is very little evident vegetation and not very much actual rainfall.
The interdisciplinary effort required figuring out not only how to draw moisture from the air on a large enough scale, but how to let people know that the water was available for their consumption.
Engineers on the project have installed five generators to suck moisture out of the air and convert it into liquid. The purification structure is sandwiched between two huge billboards which advertise the availability of the water.
Once they had worked out the mechanics of extracting the moisture from the air, “the university asked us to think up this panel,” said Aponte, who is creative director of the Mayo Draft ad agency.
He said the project — part water generator, part advertising billboard — has filled a real need here, as “there are many people who have no access to clean water,” he told AFP.
“We have seen that this has a huge potential if you get to use it in other areas of Lima, or even other countries that have many water problems,” said Aponte, who said he has received overseas queries about the project.
Carlos Cardenas, who works as a driver and travels regularly by the Pan-American Highway that runs along Peru’s coast, stops alongside the sign, taking several glasses of water before moving on.
“I often stop here to get water because it is quite good, and not nearly as polluted as it seems to be in other places,” he told AFP.

Men Aiming Higher. Health Walk. Saturday, May 18, 2013. Maryland




2013 Men Aiming Higher Health Walk (3rd Annual)

When
Saturday May 18, 2013 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM EDT
Add to Calendar


Where
Largo High School
505 Largo Rd
Upper Marlboro,, MD 20774
Driving Directions

Help us in our mission to curb obesity and strengthen families!
Have a health & wellness focused business or organization?


Sincerely,

Men Aiming Higher - Health And Wellness
Men Aiming Higher
301-383-1690

Scientists Say Oil Industry Likely Caused Largest Oklahoma Earthquake

NOTE:  Before my participation in the Kuwait Oil & Gas Summit, March 2013, I had submitted a question to the U.S. Geological Survey regarding the possibility of the removal of sub-surface material contributing to the number of earthquakes worldwide.                             Charles D. Sharp.  CEO.  Black Emergency Managers Association


http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/energy/2013/03/130329-wastewater-injection-likely-caused-quake/?goback=%2Egde_95914_member_227618106

Joe Eaton
Published March 29, 2013
The largest recorded earthquake in Oklahoma history was likely triggered by the injection of wastewater from oil production into wells deep beneath the earth, according to a study published Tuesday in the scientific journalGeology.

The magnitude 5.7 earthquake, which struck in 2011 near Prague in central Oklahoma, is the largest and most recent of a number of quakes scientists have tied to wastewater injection from oil and natural gas production, raising new concerns about the practice.

Advanced methods of oil and gas drilling create massive amounts of toxic wastewater. For example, hydraulic fracturing, also known as fracking, uses high-pressure water to unlock natural gas from shale formations. Drillers also use water to force oil from wells that cannot be captured through traditional methods, part of a practice known as "enhanced oil recovery." (See related interactive: "Breaking Fuel from the Rock.")

The use of such methods has exploded in the United States in recent years, contributing to the domestic boom in shale gas and oil production. Much of the wastewater that emerges as a byproduct is pumped into wells beneath the earth's surface for disposal.

Although the controversial practice of fracking has been directly linked to at least two seismic events (small tremors in Garvin County, Oklahoma and Lancashire, England), the wastewater injection that follows fracking is much more likely to set the earth shaking. That's because injection wells receive far more water than fracking sites, said Katie Keranen, lead author of the Geology study. And unlike at fracking sites, the water is not removed. As pressure builds in these disposal wells, it pushes up against geological faults, sometimes causing them to rupture, setting off an earthquake. (See related blog post: "Tracing Links Between Fracking and Earthquakes.")

This is what most likely triggered the 2011 Oklahoma quake, according to the study. At the time of the earthquake, which damaged 14 homes and was felt as far away as Texas, there were three active wastewater injection wells—abandoned oil wells used for storage after oil drilling operations—within 1 mile (1.5 kilometers) of the site.

Keranen, an assistant professor of geology and geophysics at the University of Oklahoma, was at home at the time of the quake. Soon thereafter, she installed seismometers that recorded more than 10,000 aftershocks, which helped scientists estimate the area of the ruptured faults. The data showed that the initial rupture reached incredibly close to an active well—within 660 feet (200 meters)—and the majority of the aftershocks were located within the same level of sedimentary rock as the wastewater injection wells.

The study contends that the proximity of the quake to the active well, combined with rising wellhead pressure before the tremors and the relative lack of seismic activity preceding the event, suggest injection caused the quake. But it also says it is impossible to prove without a doubt. "Without question there is a strong likelihood that [the quake] was induced," Keranen said.

Luckily, the area is rural, and only two people were injured. "If this happened in a high-population center, we would expect a lot more damage," Keranen said. "This is something we should take seriously and help mitigate the risk of it happening again."

In addition to recording the largest quake linked to wastewater injection, theGeology study also shows that it can take decades for an injection well to spark an earthquake. In most documented cases, seismic activity begins within months after workers begin injecting wastewater into a well, and stops when the injection pressure is released, the study says. The 2011 Oklahoma earthquake, however, took place after wastewater injection had been occurring at the wells for more than 17 years.

Large earthquakes are rare in the United States east of the Rocky Mountains. However, the number increased dramatically after 2008, according to the study. The reason is unclear. However, a 2012 report by the National Academies of Science found the energy industry may be increasing the risk of earthquakes by injecting wastewater underground. (See related blog post: "Report Links Energy Activities to Higher Quake Risk.")

Fracking is one major cause of the increase in energy production wastewater. Although the process may not be the direct cause of the quakes, each drill site requires between 3 to 5 million gallons of water per frack, much of which is later disposed of underground. (See related story: "Water Demand for Energy to Double by 2035")

John Bredehoeft, a geological expert at the Washington State research firmHydrodynamics Group, said scientists have long known that wastewater injection cause earthquakes. "There is no question about that anymore," he said.
But Bredehoeft, who held research and management positions during a 33-year career at the U.S. Geological Survey, said the overwhelming majority wastewater wells in the United States appear to be safe. The problem, he said, is scientists have no way of determining which of the roughly 30,000 wells are likely to trigger earthquakes.

"We don't know enough about the earth's crust to know where it will happen," Bredehoeft said. "Almost nowhere do we have enough data to do that."

Heather Savage, a research professor of geophysics at Columbia University, and a co-author of the Geology study, said increased data collection about wells could help prevent future earthquakes like the one that shook Oklahoma in 2011. "[The occurrence of human-induced earthquakes is] rare, but it is increasing. It's something we need to get ahead of," Savage said.

Despite the study's findings, some experts remain skeptical that wastewater injection caused the Oklahoma earthquake. A statement released by the Oklahoma Geological Survey in advance of Tuesday's study said its data show the earthquake was likely "the result of natural causes."

This story is part of a special series that explores energy issues. For more, visitThe Great Energy Challenge.

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