Tuesday, October 18, 2016

We Need more of this in our communities. Blacks On Purpose (BOP) TV October 2016

http://blackonpurposetelevisionnetwork.fanbridge.com/campaigns/show.php?id=1383152&sid=227183841


VOLUNTEERS WANTED FROM THE FILM, TELEVISION AND ENTERTAINMENT COMMUNITY THIS SATURDAY!

AS WE GIVE BACK TO OUR NEIGHBORS OF THE NEW HOME OF BOP TV IN ATLANTA'S FLORIDA HEIGHTS COMMUNITY


BLACK ON PURPOSE TELEVISION NETWORK PRESENTS

THE BIG CLEANUP!
Saturday October 22nd 2016 from 8am-4pm

We will Be meeting At 354 Brooks Ave SW Atlanta, 30310



Block Captain - Geneva Brooks
Assistant Block Captain Pastor Ronald Morton



The big cleanup is a beautification event being sponsored by Black on Purpose Television Network for its neighbors on Autumn Lane and Brooks Avenue.
We thank our new neighbors in Florida Heights for supporting  BOP TV in our mission to promote positive images of people of color around the world that are free from negative stereotypes as well as, the enrichment of communities through training and job creation in media, arts and technology..


Special Thanks to


Lawrence McIntosh with Supreme Scapes


For providing the Landscaping Services for the big cleanup
If you have Landscaping needs Contact him at 404-822-5046


COME OUT AND JOIN US THIS SATURDAY AND GIVE BACK TO A GREAT COMMUNITY!


_________________________________________________________________________________________


SUPPORT BOP TV ON PATREON!


support positive images of people of color and and the amazing shows on black on purpose television


Support Positive Images of people of color 

Support BOP TV!







HAITI. Immunizations. 2016

https://www.passporthealthusa.com/destination-advice/haiti/?paid=1&satid=752&gclid=CLqBqJrT5c8CFUtahgodId4Nhg\

Travel Vaccines and Advice for Haiti

HAITI
Expert Travel Medicine
Preparation For Any
Destination
With 250+ travel clinics nationwide, Passport Health is your local leading provider of travel vaccinations and medications. Prepare your health for travel, visit us before you go.
The island nation of Haiti has experienced tragic events within the past few years, including a devastating earthquake in 2010. While the country has tried to pick up the pieces since then, rebuilding has been slow. Even with these terrible experiences, however, the country has a spirit that is unwavering. Haiti has many traditions such as bright, colorful paintings depicting daily life, Haitian Vodoo, Carnival festivals referred to as Kanaval, and relaxing Kompas music. All of these elements combine to create a vibrant and rich culture supported by a welcoming and proud people.

Do I Need Vaccines for Haiti?

Yes, some vaccines are recommended or required for Haiti. The CDC and WHO recommend the following vaccines for Haiti: typhoidhepatitis Ahepatitis Brabies,measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) and influenza.

Which vaccines do I need for Haiti?

VACCINEHOW DISEASE SPREADS
TyphoidContaminated Food or Water
Hepatitis AContaminated Food or Water
Hepatitis BContaminated Body Fluids
(Sex, needles, etc.)
RabiesInfected Animals
Measles, Mumps, Rubella (MMR)Various Vectors
InfluenzaAirborne Droplets
Sources: Centers for Disease Control, World Health Organization and ISTM.

Haiti Climate Information

MIN AVG TEMPMAX AVG TEMPAVG HUMIDITYAVG DAYS OF RAIN
Jan68°F
20°C
87°F
31°C
58%3
Feb68°F
20°C
87°F
31°C
58%5
Mar69°F
21°C
89°F
32°C
58%7
Apr71°F
22°C
89°F
32°C
60%11
May71°F
22°C
89°F
32°C
65%13
Jun73°F
23°C
91°F
33°C
61%8
Jul73°F
23°C
93°F
34°C
56%7
Aug73°F
23°C
93°F
34°C
61%11
Sep73°F
23°C
91°F
33°C
65%12
Oct71°F
22°C
89°F
32°C
68%12
Nov71°F
22°C
87°F
31°C
66%7
Dec69°F
21°C
87°F
31°C
61%3
Average temperatures in Haiti may vary depending on the region of your stay, so be sure to consider each area you plan to visit and pack clothing and skin and eye protectants that will adequately shield you from the effects of both regular and hazardous weather conditions.

Dept of State. Human Trafficking Annual Report. October 2016




On Tuesday, October 18, the U.S. Advisory Council on Human Trafficking released its annual report on human trafficking.

Each member of the Advisory Council is a survivor of human trafficking, and together they represent a diverse range of backgrounds and experiences.

The Council, established by the Justice for Victims of Trafficking Act (JVTA), provides a formal platform for trafficking survivors to advise and make recommendations on federal anti-trafficking policies to President Obama'a Interagency Task Force to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons.
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HAITI. Waste management considerations.



Back to PAHO
Go to WHO
From 2013.  Still relevant in 2016.


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Addressing Waste Management in Haiti

Article and Photos by Sam Vigersky
Representatives from PAHO/WHO, UNEP, and World Vision stand between mountains of rotting garbage at Truitier Municipal Dump (TMD) in Port-au-Prince. The stench alone would drive most people away at the entrance, but Sally Edwards, a PAHO/WHO advisor on environmental health, brings everyone further into the site to see the waste managementprojects. Amid thunderous dump trucks and scrappy 700-pound pigs mingling with goats, Sally explains where pits for medical waste stand in relation to the newly constructed road they are standing on.  Truitier has always been a city dumping ground, but over the last six months a consortium of health partners have been working to increase its capacity for a more sustainable waste management system in Haiti.
After the earthquake, waste management became an increasingly complex problem. Medical products like needles, disposable gloves, and bandages piled up at field hospitals and health centers with no system for disposal. Left in trash piles, they increase the risk for transmission of diseases like HIV, hepatitis, and tuberculosis. The displaced population of 1.5 million living in spontaneous settlement sites posed outsized challenges for liquid and solid waste. In particular, the build-up of excreta in camps can contaminate water sources and serve as a breeding ground for flies to spread dangerous salmonella and E. coli bacteria.
During the initial response in January, PAHO/WHO provided public health institutions and NGOs with 20,000 colored plastic bags for safe disposal of health care waste and 1,000 sharps containers for needle disposal. This was only the first step in developing a more robust medical waste management system. To ensure timely and safe pickup, PAHO/WHO contracted Haitian Solid Waste Collection Agency (SMCRS) personnel, trained them to safely remove this type of waste and then provided vaccination against diseases. The staff used two specially designated trucks to pick up waste at 24 health facilities in Port-au-Prince.
The system was not perfect, but as Sally Edwards noted, “It was imperative. Hospitals needed to be supported in managing the huge amount of waste generated following the earthquake.  A lot of space surrounding their facilities was used as tent wards and infectious waste needed to be taken off site as quickly as possible.” Once the medical waste was collected, it was dumped at Truitier, where PAHO/WHO worked to build capacity for disposing of this hazardous material by paying for construction of two medical waste pits.
In addition to the hazards posed by medical waste, PAHO/WHO environmental health experts recognized the urgent need to remove latrine excreta from internally displaced persons (IDP) camps. While health care waste pits were being dug, three sludge pits were also constructed at Truitier to complement a program run by the Water Sanitation and Hygiene Cluster. Under that initiative, IDP camps throughout metropolitan Port-au-Prince were identified, and donated de-sludging trucks were dispatched to remove 3,000-5,000 cubic meters of excreta each week.
Sometimes the best laid plans hit unforeseen obstacles, which in this case happen to be more trash. “I remember arriving here in April and discovering the road leading to one of the medical waste pits had become totally impassable because of solid waste and mud,” noted Sally as she reflected on the situation. “Rather than drive a half mile to the correct site once in Truitier, some truck drivers had dumped solid waste in the middle of the road. This action had a cascading effect. The next trucks to arrive were blocked, and had no choice but to dump their trash in the road. It definitely felt like major setback.” To address the issue, PAHO/WHO quickly funded repairs of the blocked 2,000 meter road and turning circle that allowed access to the pits. Two supervisors at Truitier were also hired to oversee disposal of waste in designated sites. This will prevent truck drivers from dumping in the road in the future.
More recently, PAHO/WHO has been working with the Ministry of Health and other partners to establish a longer term solution to the health care waste disposal system in Haiti.  A plan is underway to reestablish the incinerator network and disposal options for waste that cannot be incinerated are being proposed. A new training initiative within hospitals on health care waste management is about to begin, which will continue to build capacity in the health system. Finally, PAHO/WHO continues to support partners removing liquid waste from settlement sites. Two additional lagoons for excreta, each with the capacity to treat 25,000 cubic meters, were built in June and July. These pits are an interim solution while a long-term plan is being designed by the partnering agencies. Going forward, PAHO/WHO plans to continue its technical support of waste management projects in collaboration with SMCRS and the Ministry of Health.
 
Last Updated on Wednesday, 31 July 2013 14:05

http://www.paho.org/disasters/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=1365%3Aaddressing-waste-management-in-haiti&catid=1049%3Aspotlight-stories&lang=en


October 2016. Conference to Rebuild Health Systems in Countries Devastated by Ebola Held in Washington

Conference to Rebuild Health Systems in Countries Devastated by Ebola Held in Washington

Washington, D.C. -  A conference, organized by several non-governmental organizations to review the current state of national and international efforts to assist in rebuilding the healthcare delivery systems, environment management, and develop emergency preparedness in countries of the Mano River Union (MRU) worst affected by the Ebola epidemic, took place recently in Silver Spring, Maryland, outside Washington, DC, USA.

The “International Conference on Post Ebola Capacity Building for the Mano River Union” brought together an array of professional experts in health science, environmental, disaster and emergency management response, education, as well as private and public sector leaders, and the MRU Diaspora Community, among others. 

The goal of the impressive conference was to discuss lessons learned from the Ebola epidemic, assess the state of post-Ebola initiatives in the three worst affected countries, identify specific needs, seek and lobby for continuous international help to sustain the MRU countries.  

The conference, held October 6, 2016, was organized by the U.S. State of Maryland and Liberia Sister States Committee (MLSSC), Africa Environmental Watch (AEW), International Medical Corps (IMC), and Help Africa (HA).

Diplomats from the embassies of three MRU countries – Liberia, Guinea, and Sierra Leone, also attended the conference, which convened several panels on Medicine, Environment, Education, Disaster Response, Maritime, Empowering the Disables, and uniting the African Diaspora to support sustainable development in Africa.

In welcome remarks, Ms. Sheila Durant, a lawyer who is chair of the MLSSC, underscored the commitment of her organization to continue to deepen the relationship between the U.S. State of Maryland and Liberia, including support to Liberia in education and other areas of need. She added that the purpose of the conference was to bring the MRU Diaspora and interested partners together to deliberate on how to assist in the process of establishing a better healthcare systems in Africa, especially the MRU countries such as Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone, which were worst affected by the Ebola epidemic. 
   
The Sister State Program Agreement, signed between the State of Maryland, USA and Bong County and Maryland County of Liberia in 2007, is to enhance the many opportunities for cooperation in business and industry, arts and culture, education, and also to build long-term relationships, promote commercial cooperation and develop joint program of exchange in the areas indicated.

Earlier in opening remarks, environmental activist and engineer Morris T. Koffa, Executive Director of Africa Environmental Watch, who served as Conference Chair, said the conference was intended to bring together professionals of diverse background to deliberate on efforts that must be made to sustain progress in rebuilding the health systems and establish effective emergency preparedness in the MRU countries.    

Delivering the keynote address, Mr. Melvin Foote, President, Constituency For Africa (CFA), a leading Africa advocacy organization in Washington, assured that the CFA will continue to strongly advocate for the establishment of the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) in Africa so as to undertake medical research and respond promptly to health emergencies that may arise in Africa.

The noted American activist in the cause of Africa expressed the need for the African Diaspora to organize and be pro-active in advocating for solutions to Africa’s problems.  He added that there is a lot that the African Diaspora in the United States can achieve on behalf of the continent by organizing around specific goals and programs and using their expertise and collective resources.     

Deputizing for Liberia’s Ambassador to the United States, H.E. Jeremiah C. Sulunteh, Hon. Gabriel I H Williams, Minister Counselor for Press and Public Affairs at the Embassy of Liberia, indicated that the Government and people of Liberia welcome the initiatives the various organizations are undertaking to strongly advocate for international support to ensure sustainable progress in the MRU.

Hon. Williams said Liberia is faced with serious medical challenges due to inadequate capacity of its healthcare system.  He mentioned what is reported to by an alarming rise in hypertension (commonly known as high blood pressure in Liberia), which has caused the lives of many young and abled body Liberians, especially professionals and leaders of diverse background, who were breadwinners for their families.

Hon. Williams called on the medical experts and groups to consider the need for serious medical intervention in the areas of hypertension and mental health, which have become grave health challenges since the end of the Liberian civil upheaval.

 Among the several panel groups that made presentation at the conference was a panel on Medicine under the title, Healthcare: the Path to Sustainable Growth/Saving Lives Through Medicine.
This panel included medical doctors who are originated from Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone. The co-facilitator of the Panel on Medicine was Ms. Luana Kiandoli, a lifelong advocate in the US for the improvement of Liberia’s healthcare. She is a specialist in tropical disease and establishment of medical laboratories and has taught graduate medical education.   

Mr. Charles Sharpe, a retired US Air Force Inspector General and founder and CEO of the Black Emergency Managers Association (BEMA), one of the speakers at the conference, stressed the need for a robust disaster and emergency management preparedness in the MRU and Africa by extension to help reduce the risk and impact of potential catastrophic events.

Dealing with the topic, Maritime: Clean Ocean Program and Port Security, Mr. Harry T. Conway, Alternate Representative of Liberia to the International Maritime Organization (IMO), and Mr. Gerald F. B. Cooper, President, Maritime Cooper Associates, Inc., discussed programs and policies being undertaken by the Liberian Government and the international community to ensure global maritime safety and environmental protection, among others.

On Education, Dr. Barbara Simmons, who serves as Inaugural Dean of International Education and Associate Professor at the William V.S. Tubman University in Maryland County, Liberia, spoke on the importance of education and Tubman University’s role in building capacity.


Representatives of Morgan State University in Baltimore, which has a MOU in education partnership with Tubman University under the Maryland and Liberia Sister States relationship, and the University of Maryland Eastern Shore, also participated in the conference.


Sustainable Development Goals

Sustainable Development Goals
SDGs - Sustainable Development Goals

American Red Cross: Regional Disaster Cycle Services New and Continued Employment Opportunities: 11/14/2019

RC32259 Disaster Program Manager (Aztec, NM) (Open) We are currently seeking a Disaster Program Manager (Aztec, NM) to work in our A...

..Haiti. We will not forget.

Drink Life Beverages ....A Woman Owned Enterprise

Drink Life Beverages ....A Woman Owned Enterprise
Drink for Life. Communities drinking and eating well.

BEMA International ONLINE STORE

BEMA International ONLINE STORE
Mission is to increase the diversity of corporate America by increasing the diversity of business school faculty. We attract African-Americans, Hispanic-Americans and Native Americans to business Ph.D. programs, and provide a network of peer support on their journey to becoming professors.

Online Courses Free College Courses

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