Friday, July 3, 2020

COVID-19 and Climate Change



A young Indian woman wearing a mask in Mumbai. Photo credit: Kunal Umesh Mohite/Shutterstock.com


The global COVID-19 lockdown to contain the spread of the virus has severely restricted economic activity, and reports are emerging from across the globe of blue skies becoming visible, in some cases for the first time in people’s lifetime. These improvements will likely dissipate as lockdowns are lifted, and economic activity resumes. Will the air once again become polluted, or is there a possibility for countries to use economic recovery programs to grow back stronger and cleaner? Discover in our latest analysis!

Largest response: When COVID-19 emerged as a global threat, the World Bank Group responded with the largest and fastest crisis response in its history. Learn how we strive to protect the people most exposed to its damaging effects.

Water woes:
Water utilities are struggling with a loss of revenue, reduced availability of critical materials and deferred investments. How can they keep water flowing during the COVID-19 (coronavirus) pandemic?

Building awareness: Afghanistan has redeployed two leading development programs to promote health recommendations to fight COVID-19 in thousands of rural and urban communities. Awareness campaigns have helped dispel misinformation about the coronavirus while promoting precautionary measures like frequent hand washing and wearing masks.

Plastic pollution: COVID-19 threatens to undermine the efforts against plastic pollution in oceans with an increase in single-use plastic through PPE kits, gloves, and face shields.

Go deeper: Learn how the World Bank Group is responding to the COVID-19 (coronavirus) pandemic. Explore our multilingual portal. Click, bookmark and come back for updates.


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PhD Project
Mission is to increase the diversity of corporate America by increasing the diversity of business school faculty. We attract African-Americans, Hispanic-Americans and Native Americans to business Ph.D. programs, and provide a network of peer support on their journey to becoming professors.